April 2019

Just fire a cop

- by Alyson Shane


Last Tuesday Colin and I were having a beer at The Yellow Dog and we were talking about the recent uproar in the city over the new $5 charge to attend the hockey playoff street party.

100% of the proceeds from ticket sales are going to fund the United Way's homeless, mental illness, and addictions programs in the city

which, I dunno, seems like a pretty OK thing to do with the money if you ask me

especially considering that one of the major complaints suburbanites have about downtown is that it's filled with drunk homeless people messed up on drugs

(it's not.)

People were posting about this new $5 charge all over the place, and we were talking about how most of them are forgetting that a downtown street party closes several major roads, impacts nearby businesses and services, and requires additional policing, among other things, and paying $5 to support our homeless population isn't really a big ask if you think about it.

It wasn't very crowded in the bar and as we were talking a dude kept looking over at us, and at first I thought he was agreeing with what we were saying because he just sat there and smiled and nodded along, but as we were getting up to pay he turned to me and said:

"Hey, I heard you guys talking about the Whiteout Party tickets. I think that's bullshit, man, that shit should be free!" 

So I explained my points about the homeless and street closures and extra policing, and he got this funny look on his face which made me hope that he was going to give me a thoughtful response.

But then he said

"Fuck that, we don't need extra police. Do you know how many tickets you could pay for with a cop's salary?! What do they make, $100,000 a year? JUST FIRE A COP!"

Now generally I try to be considerate of other people's opinions, but that has to be one of the most profoundly stupid things I've ever heard

and I just stood there for a second with a blank look on my face. Then I said "OK cool, enjoy the game" and left, because what do you even say to that?

He clearly has no respect for people who put their lives on the line to keep us safe, and there's no point in trying to reason with someone who has such a loose grasp on how the world works.

Besides, that guy wasn't there to have a real discussion. He was there to wear his Jets jersey, go drink more beer with his buddies at the street party, and enjoy the benefits of a downtown that he clearly has no interest in supporting.

He just comes downtown to party, man.

Which makes him a lot like all the other people who voted 2-1 against allowing pedestrians to cross a street in our downtown 

who are suddenly now OK with people getting wasted and stumbling around downtown near high-traffic intersections while disrupting the normal flow of traffic

as long as they're the ones doing it

and as long as they aren't forced to donate five bucks to help the homeless.

But hey, who knows.

Maybe that dude's onto something.

I bet we could fill a lot of potholes with those cop salaries.

Tags: Winnipeg

 

Sunday was a weird day

- by Alyson Shane


I wasn't at my best over the weekend.

I woke up on the wrong side of the bed and from the minute I got up everything felt overwhelming, negative, and frustrating. I snapped at John and I snapped at my friends and I posted some dumb shit to Twitter that I later deleted because I looked at what I'd said and realized that even though it felt good to call out some shitty behaviour I'd been made aware of in the moment, imitating that toxic behaviour didn't actually make me feel any better or help the situation at all.

We were planning to go to Electric Six on Sunday night and I spent most of the day in an anxious panic worrying that I wouldn't be able to handle being in a crowded public space trying to focus on a band I like and would spend the whole time

standing with that tingling, tight feeling in my face and stomach and throat 

kind of like the numbness that hits you just before you throw up or when you get some really bad news

and I kept saying "I can't, I can't, I can't" because I believed it.

Luckily John is an understanding and patient person and he said "babe if you need to stay home that's okay, but I want you to know I was really looking forward to seeing the show together"

which was hard for me to accept because of the baggage I have from years of having my feelings and needs invalidated and thrown in my face

but I wanted to try 

so I said "let's go to dinner instead of hanging around the house" and we went to Elephant & Castle and I had a really good burger with bacon and BBQ sauce and we laughed and talked about our super-secret project over pints of Guinness.

We talked to some ladies in town from Calgary sat down next to us and started chatting with us which seems to happen every time John and I go somewhere

and I deleted all the dumb shit I said online and reflected on it publicly 

(because it's good to 'fess up to when you're being a tit, I think, which I was)

and maybe it was the beer or maybe the music but when I started dancing in the crowd at Electric Six the numb feeling that was sitting in my gut and throat and face started to melt away, and it was nice to have a break from that feeling for a little while.


 

You can make money doing anything these days

- by Alyson Shane


I've been working for nearly 10 hours so to mellow I was sitting on the couch watching a video by my favourite ASMR artist

(look it up)

where she's walking around her studio showing people the process and setup she uses to create ASMR videos and I keep thinking

"This girl has 1.5 million subscribers and makes a living creating these videos"

which literally involve creating fake scenes and talking/whispering gently at people to help them relax, go to sleep, or just feel nice.

And yes, okay, it's not a perfect system and video creators have to work a crazy grind to beat the algorithm and generate enough ad revenue

but it's still kinda nuts that this is the thing she does to make money, don't you think?

Either way, as I'm watching this video she starts talking about how she looks "deep into the eye of the camera" so she can create a more intimate experience for the viewer, and how before she creates her videos she'll meditate, or read messages from a "Gratitude Folder"

which is a folder she has filled with messages people have sent her thanking her for her videos, or saying kind things about them, or telling her about how her videos helped them through a really tough time

and it occurred to me

this woman making ASMR videos on YouTube for a living has probably touched more people's lives than a lot of us ever will.

Not only that, but she also clearly really enjoys what she does, and can see real-life examples of how her work has value and contributes to the world around her.

So maybe it's a grind and absolutely we need to push for fair treatment for creators, but it's still a living and people in startups and small businesses have to grind and hustle, too

so we can make money doing something we enjoy

and while it's a tough slog and sometimes feels unrewarding, for some of us it's the very best thing in the world

getting to do the thing we love for a living

and it's pretty cool that we live in a time where that's possible.

Tags: Thoughts