Tagged: winnipeg

Fall is settling in

- by Alyson Shane

I can feel it in the air when I wake up and when it rains. The coolness that
came too fast this year, it seems.

Even without Folk Fest and Rainbow Trout the summer flew by, every day
heightened by the fact that 

winter is coming

and with it more staying inside and cozying up and baking and
other things I like and enjoy, honestly

but I'm not ready for it yet.

I'm hungry for more summer, more heatwaves
more riding bikes and drinking beers in parks and waking up to water the garden
and going for long walks and BBQing and

feeling normal
almost.

The other weekend we went camping in Spruce woods

(it was the last time we'll probably see our friends for a while, given how much
Brian Pallister and the Conservatives fucked this up)

so I'm glad we got to get together again
we went hiking and swimming in the river
and made amazing food and laughed until our faces and stomachs hurt
listening to The Boys Are Back in Town 

again and again for the lulz.

On Saturday around 2 AM I walked to the bathroom, up the winding path up the hill
the night was clear and still
I could see the Milky Way and satellites going by

there was nobody around, all the campsites nearby were quiet
it was just me and the frogs and toads and crickets
and my friends laughing in the distance

enjoying the night.

Calm, serene, (almost) silent
free of worries and fears and anxieties
for a while I stood there, looking up at the sky
breathing in the cool air and thinking

"I'm happy"

and feeling almost
bad
for feeling so happy
in all of this

but if there's anything the pandemic has taught me

it's that happiness is
fleeting
and not guaranteed

because those moments when you can
pretend, forget, ignore
that there's a dangerous world out there
look around and feel normal and content and
at peace
like the vice grip in yr chest has unwound
and
you can take a deep breath in again

those moments are what you'll cling to when shit hits the fan.

(Please don't let shit hit the fan)

Tags: Winnipeg

 

Somehow it's May already?

- by Alyson Shane


Yesterday we walked to our local coffee shop to buy beans and stood in a line on the sidewalk out front because only one person can be in the store at a time. Usually you have to walk all the way to the back of the store to pay at the register, but they had everything set up on stools and tables and this little mobile serving station made of wood.

It wasn't perfect but it worked. We got beans and two iced lattes and I never thought I'd be so happy to talk to a friendly face from the neighbourhood. I felt giddy afterwards and thinking about

just how nice and normal it felt

tugs at my heartstrings a full 24 hours later. 

We went to Food Fare and it turns out one of the Pandemic Things that I fail at is following the taped arrows on the floor in a grocery store because I spend so much time thinking about what I need and not enough time looking at the ground that I wind up walking down them the "wrong" way and needing to circle back and start over. 

But honestly it's not so bad. 

Wear yr mask. Smile with your eyes. Say "thank you" to every damn person risking their health and well-being to serve your community.

Yesterday was the last "trip" we'll take into the neighbourhood for at least the next few weeks until we know what community spread is like with eased social restrictions. 

Manitoba's cases seem to have plateaued so we're in Phase One of reopening but John and I are spooked by all the tweets and posts about busy patios and parks and too many people lining up outside of stores and not social distancing properly.

I'm sad and worried but trying to have a stiff upper lip about it since we're luckier than most and (hopefully) all another surge in cases locally would mean for us is more time spent hunkering down at home.

I was worried that the minute we eased social distancing guidelines people would go crazy and act a fool and once again the internet confirmed that I was right. It's upsetting to know people are putting each other and their loved ones in danger to stand in a too-crowded line or have a beer on a jam-packed patio

People seem to think they're safe and I hope they're right.

But everyone who dies because of the pandemic is someone's somebody and I can't wait until this is over.


 

Things are changing

- by Alyson Shane


the province is starting to confirm cases and things are going on lockdown

shows and events are cancelled

the universities and colleges are cancelling classes and moving online

buses are empty which is great because apparently they're cesspools

(gross, City of Winnipeg)

the lines at the stores are nuts, several aisles long

and businesses are being encouraged to let people work from home.

John's office went remote so he's home and I'm home since this is where I work, and we're cancelling any social plans and not really going outside for the next while.

We stocked up tp and disinfecting wipes just like everyone else

but we went the extra step of buying lots of canned goods and dry goods and freezing extra produce as well

(because you need to eat in order to use all that tp, duh)

and as far as social distancing goes I'm feeling pretty good about it.

I worry about my Grandma, though.

And other people's grandmas.

And even John because he's 39 in a few weeks and apparently this thing takes down people in their 40's now and there's no way I'll risk losing that strange bird if I can help it.

Hell no.

In a few hours I have a Zoom call with the TEDxWinnipeg steering committee to talk about our event in June and whether we'll cancel it.

I'm not 100% sure but I have a feeling that I know how it will go. Who knows.

Everything changes so quickly these days.

It's hard not to be glued to Twitter and the news and all the damn articles and that guy on Joe Rogan and

then there's the debate on Sunday night which you know imma watch

and you know they'll be talking about it in that big, empty studio with no people in it because social distancing

but I'm gonna try and not obsess.

At least we just got a ton of alcohol delivered so if things turn pear-shaped I can drown my sorrows in chocolate porters and box'o wine.

Stay safe and don't forget to wash your hands!


 

Coronavirus is freaking people out

- by Alyson Shane


One of the things about living in a relatively unknown place in the middle of the flat prairies is that stuff like this tends to skip you by or not matter as much

(SARS? What SARS?)

so while places like Calgary are freaking out and swarming Costco's at 10 AM to buy toilet paper in bulk

and events like SXSW and GDC and Facebook's F8 Developers Conference are all being cancelled amid fears that the virus will spread

and stock prices are crashing and the market is slowing

for the most part things here at home feel pretty normal.

Last week I took the bus multiple times every day

on Saturday I spoke on a panel at an event where about 100 people attended

and none of my clients seem all that concerned about the Coronavirus impacting their events and businesses all that much.

Last week we stocked up on cat litter and food and canned goods and Lysol wipes and toilet paper and paper towel and even bottles of water and cans of club soda and

I felt silly, honestly

I remember when people were stocking up during SARS and then that

(thankfully)

went nowhere

and that's kinda how this feels.

Like we're preparing for something that might never happen.

A lockdown or a quarantine situation that 

like the last pandemic

might just skip over my cold prairie province almost entirely.

But being prepared feels stupid until it isn't.


 

The Toad in the Hole Pub is moving up the street

- by Alyson Shane

**I wrote this back on November 19, 2019 and thought "what the heck! Let's publish it."**

Okay, it's only moving up the street to a different location which doesn't seem like such a big deal

until you walk into the current Toad in the Hole Pub location and realize that there's no way to re-create the 

unique ambience

of drinking here.

It looks like an old English pub and it's split between two levels. There are big, worn-out booths and beaten wooden chairs and what I've always suspected is a church pew along the front window that faces the street.

It's dingy and yellow, with green walls covered in wood panelling that looks dusty and sweaty at the same time; the result of hundreds (maybe thousands) of handprints and sweat and cigarette smoke from back when they allowed smoking indoors.

I love this dumpy old pub.

I've been coming here since I was 18, and had decided well before my eighteenth birthday that one of the first things I would do "when I was old enough" was start hanging out at The Toad.

I'd walk by when I was underage and stare at the people with tattoos, drinking hard alcohol out of small glass cups, smoking, hanging around a pub situated on top of a venue called The Cavern, and a bunch of tattoo parlours.

It was exactly the opposite of the boring, cookie-cutter neighbourhood I'd grown up in and I became obsessed with it.

When I finally moved downtown and was living in The Roslyn up the street I'd walk home from work, have a shower, and park myself at The Toad on one of the long wooden benches that overlook Osborne Street with a beer in my hand.

I hated sitting alone. It made me feel anxious, and I worried that the people around me would judge me for sitting by myself. But, inevitably, someone I knew would walk or skateboard by and stop to have a drink on the patio with me.

Because that's what happens when you sit outside at The Toad.

And if nobody showed up and you wound up having a beer alone? 

That was okay too, because nobody gave a shit.

(In reality, nobody anywhere cares.
I know this now, but didn't then.)

Back then they only had one bathroom for women, and during the summer or late on a Friday or Saturday night you might as well have given up and peed outside instead of waiting in the line to use the single-stall women's bathroom

(or do what I did and go for a slice at Lil Pizza Heaven next door and use their bathroom while you wait.)

I've spent hours here in various states of inebriation. Last spring John and I hung out here after we went for a fancy anniversary dinner at Sous Sol up the street and met a man who ran a dog grooming business

(or was selling it, I forget)

and a magician who did tricks for us for free. 

I haven't lived in The Village for the better part of a decade and I don't go to The Toad as often as I used to. It's just not as close as The Good Will or Handsome Daughter or even The Grove.

So I don't go here much anymore. But I'm trying to lately.

I want to soak up as much of this dingy, familiar, comforting

familiar

atmosphere before it's gone. 

Which, honestly, is never something I'd thought I'd have to say about somewhere like The Toad.

It's the kind of place your parents know, and because they know it and you know it you kinda expected that it would always be there. It's the kind of place you take for granted until it's gone.

But I'm here now, drinking a shitty beer that cost $3.25 for old time's sake. Basking under the greasy light of the Victorian-style lamplight fixtures hanging over me and hammering away at my laptop while sitting on that big church pew seat I talked about above.

The only other patron is an old dude with a huge white beard who hasn't taken his jacket off and is drumming along to the El Michels Affair blasting on the speakers at an alarming pace.

It's 3:37 PM on a Tuesday and the bartenders are doing shots with their friends.

I'm going to miss this place when it's moved and the space gets subdivided into a bunch of smaller units and and leased to franchises like Jugo Juices and gyms.

Sigh.

Nothing stays the same, kids.

So cheers to The Toad in The Hole Pub, a Winnipeg staple for so many

and to the memories made

(and sometimes not remembered) 

here.

Tags: Winnipeg

 

Sometimes Winnipeg gets me down

- by Alyson Shane

But then I hear songs like this one

about the importance of free, welcoming public spaces

how our downtown library should be a beacon for everyone

celebrating everyone who comes there

to learn or relax or just

read a book

and I feel so lucky to be from a city that

inspires such beauty in the face of ugliness.

Tags: Winnipeg

 

The City of Winnipeg is closing my childhood library and I'm angry about it

- by Alyson Shane

The Seven Oaks Library, located on Jefferson Avenue in the heart of Garden City, might be closing as part of a sweeping round of cuts proposed by the Winnipeg city council.

Before I tell you why this matters, and why I'm angry, I want to tell you a story about the Seven Oaks Public Library:

I don't remember feeling happy very often growing up, but I was always happy when we went to the library.

When I was little my parents enrolled me in Story Time, and every Monday they'd take my two brothers and I to the library to borrow a big stack of books and VHS tapes. We didn't have a lot of money growing up, but the library gave us something to do, and look forward to.

As I got older and things got worse at home, my local library became somewhere I could go when I was upset, and where I could pass the time in a warm, quiet place.

I loved having a place where I could go and escape my life by diving into a good book.

I felt safe in the library, and accepted there.

I fell in love with reading, and became a writer, because of the Seven Oaks Public Library.

Without that library I wouldn't have this blog. Or my business. Or my sense of curiosity and eagerness to learn, both of which are the result of becoming an avid reader.

I wouldn't have any of that without my local library, and it might be closing.

But that's not why I'm angry.

I'm angry because our mayor and city council are lying to us about why they want to close it.

A few weeks ago the city released a budget proposal that says our city is so tight on cash that they need to make the following cuts:

  • 5 pools closing
  • 3 libraries closing
  • 5 arenas closing
  • funding cuts to all community centres
  • all improvements to athletic fields cancelled

This is upsetting news on its own, but yesterday I read that even though all these cuts are coming, the city is quietly pushing through a $71 million dollar community centre called The South Winnipeg Recreation Campus in Waverley West.

What's included in this fancy new recreation campus being built on the very edge of our city?

  • a lap tank and leisure pool
  • a fitness space, walking/running track and gymnasium
  • a community library
  • community recreation program space with *multiple gyms* and multi-purpose spaces
  • athletic fields and park space
  • a twin arena

Our civic government is cutting and under-funding programs and community centres for inner-city residents, and literally building the same things in a brand-new, high-income neighbourhoods.

This is literally robbing from the poor to give to the rich.

Through this move, the Mayor Bowman and City Hall are saying that kids like me don't matter.

Kids like me, whose parents were strapped for cash and needed a way to keep their young kids busy by borrowing books and videos and signing us up for programs

whose home lives were negative and chaotic and stressful, and who needed a safe, calm space to be alone when things got tough

who found a sense of identity through reading and felt motivated to achieve more than we felt we were worth because of what we read

according to city hall, kids like me literally don't deserve these opportunities, because we need to make sure kids in wealthy suburbs get them instead.

It's no wonder we have a meth and violence crisis in this city. It's pretty easy to see which voters City Hall and the Mayor think are most important.

Oh, and if you're wondering why you didn't hear about this when the budget was made public?

It's because the city deliberately left the dollar amount out of the capital budget:

Image via Dear Winnipeg via The City of Winnipeg

So not only is our city lying about not having money in the budget to fund these spaces and programs and pushing through a project to build literally the same thing in a rich suburb

they've also been hiding it from us and hoping we don't find out.

See why I'm angry?


I'd like to give a big shout-out to Dear Winnipeg for doing the deep-dive on the topic that inspired the post. You should read it.

Tags: Winnipeg

 

Killing time

- by Alyson Shane

I'm sitting at Espresso Junction in The Johnston Terminal, at The Forks. I've been coming to this coffee shop since I was 18, when my boyfriend Peter took me here on a date.

I'd never had a London Fog before, and he ordered one for me and told me "they're the best in the city" and I still agree. 

After that I started coming here whenever I had time in-between jobs, or when I had a long wait to catch the 18 bus home to the suburbs. I've started, finished, and cried over lots of books here.

Boys, too, back in the days when relationships were volatile and immature.

I didn't come back here for a really long time because of something bad that happened

or rather, started, here

but enough time has passed that the wound I used to feel has become softer and less raw, to the point where it almost feels like a scar on someone else's body.

Memories that belong to a person who feels like a dream.

Coming here feels like looking through a yearbook, back through years of coffees and London Fogs, layered and blended over the years.

Winnipeg, through the virtue of being a Big Small Town, is full of these spaces.

Places you visited when you were a different version of yourself, that come to mean mean complicated and layered things just by the virtue of existing or staying in business long enough. 

Places that look, sound, and smell the same; that are familiar in a way that almost feels like it's in your bones,

because maybe in some small way it is.

Tags: Winnipeg

 

The Third Color at the Prairie Theatre Exchange

- by Alyson Shane


Image via the Prairie Theatre Exchange.

I met Ian Ross a lifetime ago. Or, rather, what feels like a lifetime ago.

We worked in the same building, and when we were introduced our colleague said something to the effect of:

"This is Ian. He's kind of a big deal" and the way he laughed it off and joked about it told me that 

1. He was probably kind of a big deal*

2. We'd probably get along

* He is kind of a big deal.

I was in a really bad place at the time, and I leaned on Ian a lot to talk about what I was dealing with, and how frustrated and overwhelmed I often felt about the prospects of my future.

Ian, through the simple act of listening and asking questions (which no "adult" in my life had really done at that point) helped me work through my feelings as I tried to make sense of the world around me.

I was confused. I didn't understand how I'd gotten myself into the mess I found myself in, and I felt at a loss as to the best way forward.

So it was funny, and ironic in a way, that I found myself confronted with those same questions - "how did we get here?" and "what do we do now?" - through the lens of his most recent play The Third Color.

The play focuses on two spirits who have taken the shapes of Indigenous women: Head Full of Lice, played by Kathleen MacLean, and Agatu, played by Tracey Nepinak. 

Through dialogue that manages to somehow be sharp, resonant, and often hilarious at the same time, the spirits explore Canada's history from pre-settlers to the present day.

Over and over again, the spirits butt heads (and, in some cases, got into physical skirmishes) over whether or not helping the settlers was, in fact, the right thing to do.

Agatu, who takes the form of an elderly woman, pities the settlers who are sick and need their help. She insists that, even if the outcome isn't what they expect, that it's the "right" thing to do.

Head Full of Lice, on the other hand, is furious. She sees the generational hurt and trauma inflicted upon Indigenous peoples and repeatedly states that she wants to "burn it all down," even going so far as to take out a Canadian flag and threaten to burn it out of rage.

"Where is the third color?" they both ask, looking at the Canadian flag.

Our Canadian flag is red and white. Red is symbolic of England and white of France... but where are the Indigenous peoples in our flag? 

Where are their histories? Their stories? Their presence in the literal fabric of our country?

Through their dialogue, Head Full of Lice and Agatu represent opposing viewpoints in terms of reconciliation - should Indigenous peoples accept that "this is what we have" and try to move forward, or should they burn it all down and start again from scratch?

As a non-Indigenous person I have no real understanding of the feelings that Indigenous peoples must feel towards reconciliation in Canada. But through Head Full of Lice and Agatu's discussion I was able to get a glimpse of the complicated - and contradictory - feelings that Indigenous folks like Ian must be experiencing during this period in our history.

Which, I think, is what makes the play such an important contribution to the discussion surrounding the reconciliation attempts happening in Canada right now.

Through its comedy and drama and fierce bouts of emotion, The Third Color represents an important perspective that is timely, relevant, and challenging, while also leaving space for the audience to sit with their feelings, mixed and uncomfortable though they may be.

Art should challenge us to push the limits of our comfort zones, and that's exactly what Agatu and Head Full of Lice do throughout the play.

It made me think of the famous Duke Ellington quote that states: Art should be dangerous.

I couldn't agree more.

The Third Color is playing at the Prairie Theatre Exchange from October 2 - 20. I highly recommend checking it out.

**Big thanks to the PTE for the free tickets, and the chance to see and write about this important piece of art.**


 

It's busy in Wolseley

- by Alyson Shane


Image of these badass ladies + the Wolseley Elm via the U of M


It's busy in Wolseley

kids are getting picked up from daycare and preschool

or walking home from 

Balmoral Hall and Laura Secord

it smells like bread on Sherbrook and Wesminster

where people are waiting for the bus with their groceries

or tying their dogs up next to corner stores

next to houses with dragons on their lawns

next to houses with rainbow fences

along streets lined with

porches and sunrooms and front steps

covered in the shade 

of old Dutch elms that haven't succumbed to disease

standing guard over busy streets

filled with Moms and Dads in SUVs

heading home to dinner or soccer practice or dance class

or cyclists on their bikes

in their helmets and backpacks and reflective gear

and I'm in the street on my bike

at a four-way intersection managed by a blinking red light

watching everyone 

turn 

and cross

and turn

and cross

waving at each other and smiling

and I'm waiting my turn 

breathing in deep

trying to remember

the smell of fresh produce from the co-op

mixing with incense from Prairie Sky Books

and how the haze of the early evening light

that filters through the budding leaves

turns everything to gold.

Tags: Winnipeg

 

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